Dachshund

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History:              The Dachshund originated in Germany in the early 1600s. Bred to hunt small game such as badger and rabbit, the Dachshund has shortened legs to hunt and follow these animals to ground inside the burrows where they could fight the prey to the death. “Dachs” is the word for badger. Smaller Dachshunds where bred to hunt hare and stoat. Dachshunds have many “terrier” characteristics. They are versatile and courageous dogs and have been known to take on foxes and otters too. The breed’s population dwindled during World War l, but dogs were imported from Germany to the USA and the gene pool once again increased. The Dachshund was recognized by the AKC in 1885.

Description:         Appearance:  A typical dachshund is long-bodied and muscular, with short, stubby legs. Its front paws are unusually large and paddle-shaped, for extreme digging. Long coated dachshunds have a silky coat and short featherings on legs and ears. It has skin that is loose enough not to tear while tunneling in tight burrows to chase prey. The dachshund has a deep chest that provides increased lung capacity for stamina when hunting prey underground. Its snout is long with an increased nose area that absorbs odors.

Coat and Color:  Dachshunds exhibit three coat varieties: smooth coat (short hair), long hair, and wire-hair. Wirehaired is the least commonly seen coat in the US (it is the most common in Germany) and the most recent coat to appear in breeding standards.

Dachshunds have a wide variety of colors and patterns. They can be single-colored, single-colored with spots and single-colored with tan points plus any pattern. The dominant color is red, the most common along with black and tan. Two-colored dogs can be black, wild boar, chocolate, fawn, with tan “points”, or markings over the eyes, ears, paws, and tail, of tan or cream. A two-colored dachshund would be called by its dominant color first followed by the point color, such as “black and tan” or “chocolate and cream”. Other patterns include piebald, in which a white pattern is imposed upon the base color or any other pattern, and a lighter “boar” red.

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Temperament:  The Dachshund is curious, clever, lively, affectionate, proud, brave and amusing. Devoted to its family, it can be slightly difficult to train and housebreak, but not impossible. Dachshunds travel well. This little dog needs an owner who understands how to be his pack leader or he will take over the house, and begin to try and tell the owner what to do. If the dog is allowed to take over, many behavior problems will arise, such as, but not limited to, guarding furniture, separation anxiety, guarding food, toys or other objects, snapping, biting and obsessive barking. It will become unpredictable with children and adults they do not know. If it gets really bad, it may become unpredictable with its owner. They are usually recommended for older, considerate children, simply because most owners do not display proper pack leadership to small dogs, causing moderate to severe protectiveness, a behavior that can change if the humans start being their pack leader. If they do get the proper leadership, they can get along well with children. This breed has an instinct to dig. They are generally okay with other pets; however, once again, without proper leadership from their humans, they can be jealous, irritable, obstinate and very quick to bite, sometimes refusing to be handled. If you allow your little dog to take over your house, the dog will try his hardest to keep all of his humans in line—a weight which should not be placed on any dog’s shoulders, especially one as sweet as a little dog like the Dachshund. These negative traits are not Dachshund traits, they are small dog syndrome traits. Meaning, most owners treat their small dogs like babies, rather than giving them leadership, As well as rules they need to follow along with limits they are, and are not allowed to do, which all dogs instinctually crave. Dachshunds that have human leadership along with a daily pack walk are wonderful family companions with excellent temperaments.

Health:   Prone to spinal disc problems (Dachshund paralysis), urinary tract problems, heart disease and diabetes. Prone to mast cell tumors. Dachshunds have a tendency to become overweight and lazy. This is a serious health risk, putting added strain on the back.

Grooming:   Longhaired require daily combing and brushings; wirehaired need professional trimming twice a year, and short-haired require regular rubdown with a damp cloth. This breed is an average shedder.

Lifespan:   12-15 years

Height and Weight:  

 Standard: Height 8 – 11 inches Weight – over 11 pounds

Miniature: Height up to 5 – 7 inches Weight 11 pounds

Toy: Height up to 12 inches Weight 8 pounds

Exercise:    These are active dogs with surprising stamina; they need to be walked daily. They will also enjoy sessions of play in the park or other safe, open areas. Be careful, however, when pedestrians are about because Dachshunds are more likely to be stepped on than more visible dogs. They should be discouraged from jumping, as they are prone to spinal damage.

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Basset Hound

Basset Hound

History:

 The earliest-known depictions of short-legged hunting dogs are engravings from the Middle Kingdom of Egypt. Scent Hounds were used for hunting in both Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. It is believed that the Basset type originated as a mutation in the litters of Norman Staghounds, a descendant of the St Hubert’s Hound.Basset type hounds became popular during the reign of Emperor Napoleon III. The controlled breeding of the short haired basset began in France in the year 1870. From the existing Bassets. French bassets were being imported into England at least as early as the 1870s. Everett Millais’, who is considered to be the father of the modern Basset Hound, bred one such dog, Nicholas, to a Bloodhound bitch named Inoculation through artificial insemination in order to create a heavier basset in England in the 1890s. The first breed standard for what is now known as the Basset Hound was made in Great Britain at the end of 19th century. This standard was updated in 2010.

Temperament :

The Basset Hound is sweet, gentle, devoted, peaceful and naturally well-behaved. It fits into family life well. Its temperament should always be friendly, and never vicious, moody or harsh, and would only become so if the owners lead the dog to believe he is pack leader over humans. It can be a bit stubborn with meek owners and needs a firm, confident, and consistent owner who displays natural authority over the dog. Dogs need to know the rules of the house and have the humans stick to them. Bassets like to do tricks for food.  Housebreaking is difficult, but they do well with patient, gentle training. With proper training, they are obedient, but when they pick up an interesting smell, it’s sometimes hard to get their attention, as they like to follow their noses and may not even hear you calling them back. Only allow your Basset off lead in safe areas.

Description: 

The Basset Hound is a short, relatively heavy dog. The head is large and well-proportioned with a rounded skull. The muzzle is deep and heavy with the length being greater than the width at the brow. The brown eyes have a soft, sad look to them and are slightly sunken with a prominent haw. The darkly pigmented lips have loose hanging flews and the dewlap is very pronounced. The skin hangs loose like elastic and falls in folds on the head. The velvety ears are set low and extremely long hanging toward the ground. The large teeth meet in either a scissors or even bite. The chest is very deep, extending in front of the front legs. The dog’s hindquarters are very full and round. The paws are big. The dewclaws may be removed. The coat is dense, short, hard and shiny. There are no rules concerning color, but it is usually black, tan, white, red, or white with chestnut or sand-colored markings.

Height: Males 12 – 15 inches (30 – 38 cm) Females 11 – 14 inches (28 – 36 cm)
Weight: Males 50 – 65 pounds (23 – 29 kg) Females 45 – 60 pounds (20 – 27 kg)

Basset Hound Widescreen 2 HD Wallpapers

Health Concerns:

Do not overfeed these dogs because extra weight places too great a load on the legs and spine. A problem area is possible lameness and eventual paralysis because of short legs and a heavy, long body. As they are prone of bloat, it is also wise to feed them two or three small meals a day instead of one large meal. If they do eat a large meal keep an eye on them for several hours for any signs of bloat.

Exercise:

To keep the Basset Hound healthy, it should be given plenty of exercise, including a long daily walks to keep the dog mentally stable, but discourage it from jumping and stressing the front legs. This breed will run and play by the hour when given the chance. Because of their keen noses they tend to roam when they pick up a scent. Take care when off lead that the dog is in a safe area. When they pick up a scent they may not even hear you calling them back as their complete focus will be on finding the critter at the other end.

Life Span:

Life Span is about 10-12 years

Justin’s Thoughts

Justin would not recommend Basset Hounds for weak owners. Need firm and consistent when training the Basset Hounds.

Bandit, the Basset Hound at 2 years old

Tibetan Terrier

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History:

Because of the geographically isolated location of Tibet, Tibetan terriers were kept purebred for over 2,000 years.[5] Monks and families referred to the ancient breed as “the little people”, for they were highly valued as companions who were eager to assist in protecting properties and flocks.

Since the dog was considered a bringer of luck, mistreating or selling a Tibetan terrier was believed to cause bad luck to both family and village.

The first Tibetan terrier to come to Europe came with Dr. A.R.H. Greig of England in 1922.[7] She was given a gold and white female puppy “Bunti” for successfully performing an operation on a patient. After acquiring a second male “Rajah”, Dr. Greig established a kennel and began to breed them.

Size:

Height: 14-16 Inches

Weight: 18-30lbs

Description:

Fully grown, the Tibetan Terrier resembles a miniaturized Old English Sheepdog. The head is moderate, with a strong muzzle of medium length, and a skull neither rounded nor flat. The eyes are large, dark, and set fairly far apart. The V-shaped drop ears are well feathered, and should be set high on the sides of the skull. The body is well muscled and compact. The length of the back should be equal to the height at the withers, giving the breed its typical square look. The tail is set high, well feathered, and carried in a curl over the back. One of the more unusual features of the Tibetan Terrier is the broad, flat feet with hair between the toes. The hair of Tibetans has a long growth cycle. As a result, their coat grows quite long and pet animals will require occasional trimming. They do not shed like dogs with shorter hair growth cycles. The exception is at approximately nine months when puppies slough their entire coat in advance of acquiring their adult coat. All colors are permissible, barring liver and chocolate, and none are preferred. Gold is the rarest. Tibetan Terriers are available in any combination of solid, parti-color, tricolor, brindle or piebald, as long as the nose leather is black and the eyes and eye rims are dark

Tibetan Terrier dog breed

 

Temperament:

The temperament has been one of the most attractive aspects of the breed since it was first established. They are amiable and affectionate family dogs, sensitive to their owners and gentle with older children if properly introduced. As is fitting for a dog formerly used as a watch dog, they tend to be reserved around strangers, but should never be aggressive nor shy with them. Though not prone to excessive barking, the Tibetan Terrier has an assertive bark. . The energy level of the Tibetan is moderate to high and its general nature is happy, active, lively, intelligent and agile. They are steadfast, determined, and clever, which can lead to them being stubborn. Tibetan Terriers are usually charming and loyal. Some dogs of this breed can often be jealous, which can make it hard to live with another pet.

Health:

A UK Kennel Club survey puts the average lifespan of the breed at 12 years. About one in five lives to 15 years or more, with the longest-lived Tibetan Terrier having lived to 18.25 years. Tibetan Terrier is still susceptible to a variety of health problems, especially those related to the eyes and joints. These problems can include canine hip dysplasialuxating patellaprogressive retinal atrophylens luxationcataracts and heart murmurs.Tibetans also have a history of being somewhat allergic to dairy, wheat and grains. Tibetan Terriers can carry the genetic disease canineneuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, called Batten disease in humans. The first symptom of the disease is night blindness. Blindness and neurological signs such as epilepsy, motor abnormalities, dementia and unexpected aggression will follow some years later.

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Kuvasz

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History:

The Kuvasz (Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈkuvɒs]), is an ancient breed of a livestock dog of Hungarian origin. Mention of the breed can be found in old Hungarian texts. It has historically been used as a royal guard dog, or to guard livestock, but has been increasingly found in homes as a pet over the last seventy years.

 The word most likely comes from the Turkic word kavas meaning guard or soldier or kuwasz meaning protector. A related theory posits that the word may have originated from the ancient farmers of Russia, the Chuvash, who nurtured the breed for generations and contributed many words to the Hungarian language.

By the end of World War II, nearly all the Kuvasz dogs in Hungary had been killed. The dogs had such a reputation for protecting their families that they were actively sought and killed by German and Soviet soldiers, while at the same time some German officers used to take Kuvasz dogs home with them. After the Soviet invasion and the end of the war, the breed was nearly extinct in Hungary. After the war, it was revealed that fewer than thirty Kuvasz were left in Hungary and some sources indicate the number may have been as few as twelve. Since then, due to many dedicated breeders, Kuvasz breed have repopulated Hungary. However, as a result of this near extinction, the genetic pool available to breeders was severely restricted and there is conjecture that some may have used other breeds, such as the Great Pyrenees, to continue their programs. The issue is further clouded by the need to use an open stud book system at the time to rebuild the breed.

Temperament:

This breed is bold, brave and fearless. They were bred to work independently, which means they are not easy to obedience train. Training should never be harsh, but rather needs to be calm but firm, by a confident experienced, dominant person. The handler needs to have an air of natural authority to them. This dog needs to be controlled with the mind, not the hand. The dog will be looking for a leader and owners need to be stronger minded than the dog. They will be willful with meek or passive owners. All members of the family need to be taught how to handle the dog right from puppyhood. Owners need to teach the dog to accept welcomed guests and to look to the owner for leadership, rather than the dog expecting the owners to look to him for leadership. The biggest key to training a Kuvasz is to understand the nature of the breed as an independent guardian. It is very important NOT to use harsh training methods, but rather calm, firm methods.

Kuvasz that are going to work as flock guards need special training. An expert should be called in to assist if you are not familiar with the process. Puppies that are about 6 weeks old should not live inside the home with the humans, but rather with the flock they will be called upon to guard, so they can form a bond. When they are raised to work as the flock guardian they were bred to be they will be very reserved with strangers and territorial. A police dog trainer would be exactly the wrong kind of trainer to use. A police dog type of temperament is not what the Kuvasz is. They make terrible police dogs because they are too independent. They judge, not you, what force is necessary in any situation, based on what they believe. That comes out of instinct, and then what they are “taught.” They are really remarkable judges of how forceful to be in a situation. You need to “teach” the Kuvasz, you don’t “train” them. This does not mean physically force; you must understand that “impression” is what creates dominance. The same Kuvasz that will drive off a wolf, bear, etc., without hesitation, will stand by in the field, helping a ewe with a lamb’s delivery and making sure the lamb can find its mother. The key to successful introduction into livestock guarding seems to be an experienced older dog to guide the puppy. If not, then the owner will have his work cut out for him during the first six months to a year. You will need a lot of patience and some guidance from other people with experience. Once bonded to the livestock, the Kuvasz is going to make sure that nothing, ever, can harm them. That is their nature. It is the details along the way to that balance (the growing up process) that is stressful for the owner.

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Exercise:

The Kuvasz needs vigorous daily exercise. If it is not actively working as a flock guardian it needs to be taken on a daily, long brisk walk or jog. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog’s mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Exercising should help with chewing or digging problems—in hopes that it will tire the dog out.

Health Problems: 

Prone to hip dysplasia (check with your breeder to make sure the parents have hip clearance). Some minor issues are osteochondritis dissecans (a disease causing lameness from inflammation of the shoulder joints), hypertrophic osteodystrophy, skin problems and allergic reactions. This breed may drool and slobber.

Life Span: 

Live 10 – 12 years

Weight:

Males: 100 -115 pounds

Females: 70- 90 pounds

Height: 

Male 28 – 30 inches

Females 26 – 28 inches

Grooming: 

The thick, medium coat of the Kuvasz should be brushed weekly. Avoid bathing this breed, as the coat naturally sheds dirt and bathing will remove the oils that give the coat this property. The more you bathe this dog the more it will need to be bathed! Instead of bathing, the dog should be brushed frequently. Some people rub talcum powder or cornstarch into the coat and then brush it out again as a cleaning strategy. Check behind the ears for matting. In cold climates it will only shed seasonally, but in warmer climates, it will most likely shed all year around.

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Bernese Mountain Dog

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History:  

The breed was used as an all purpose farm dog for guarding property and to drive dairy cattle long distances from the farm to the alpine pastures. The type was originally called the Dürrbächler, for a small town (Dürrbach) where the large dogs were especially frequent. In the early 1900s, fanciers exhibited the few examples of the large dogs at Shows in Berne, and in 1907 a few breeders from the Burgdorf region founded the first breed Club, the Schweizerische Dürrbach-Klub, and wrote the first Standard which defined the dogs as a separate breed. By 1910, there were already 107 registered members of the breed. There is a photo of a working Bernese Mountain Dog, dated 1905 at the Fumee Fall rest area in Quinnesec, MI.

In the US, the Bernese Mountain Dog is growing in popularity, ranking in 32nd place by the American Kennel Club in 2013.

Color, Coat, and Grooming:

The Berner coat is gorgeous: a thick double coat with a longer outer coat and a wooly undercoat. Characteristically tricolored, the majority of the Berner’s body is covered with jet-black hair with rich rust and bright white. There’s usually a white marking on his chest that looks like an inverted cross, a white blaze between the eyes, and white on the tip of his tail.

The Berner is a shedder. He sheds moderately all year and heavily in the spring and fall. Brushing several times a week helps reduce the amount of hair around the house and keeps the coat clean and tangle-free. Bathing, every three months or so, will maintain his neat appearance.

Brushing teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.

Trim there nail about once a month if they don’t wear them down naturally. If you hear them clicking on the floor they are to long.

Height and Weight

Height at the withers is 25–27.5 in for males, while it is 23–26 in for females. Weight is 80–120 lb for males, while it is 75–100 lb for females.

Temperament:

The breed standard for the Bernese mountain dog states that dogs should not be “aggressive, anxious or distinctly shy”, but rather should be “good-natured”, “self-assured”, “placid towards strangers”, and “docile”. The temperament of individual dogs may vary, and not all examples of the breed have been bred carefully to follow the standard. All large breed dogs should be well socialized when they are puppies, and given regular training and activities throughout their lives.

Bernese are outdoor dogs at heart, though well-behaved in the house; they need activity and exercise, but do not have a great deal of endurance. They can move with amazing bursts of speed for their size when motivated. If they are sound (no problems with their hips, elbows, or other joints), they enjoy hiking and generally stick close to their people. Not being given the adequate amount of exercise may lead to barking and harassing in the Bernese.

Bernese mountain dogs are a breed that generally does well with children, as they are very affectionate. They are patient dogs that take well to children climbing over them. Though they have great energy, a Bernese will also be happy with a calm evening.

Health Problems:

Cancer is the leading cause of death for dogs in general, but Bernese Mountain Dogs have a much higher rate of fatal cancer than other breeds; in both U.S./Canada and UK surveys, nearly half of Bernese Mountain Dogs die of cancer, compared to about 27% of all dogs. Bernese Mountain Dogs are killed by a multitude of different types of cancer, including Malignant histiocytosis, mast cell tumer, lymphosarcoma, fibrosarcoma, osteosarcoma. A four-year-old Bernese with lymphoma named Dylan was one of the first dogs to receive chemotherapy at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, and it was successful.

Bernese Mountain Dogs also have an unusually high mortality due to musculoskeletal causes. Arthritis, hip dysplasia, and cruciate ligament rupture were reported as the cause of death in 6% of Bernese Mountain Dogs in the UK study; for comparison, mortality due to musculoskeletal ailments was reported to be less than 2% for pure-bred dogs in general.

Several inherited medical problems that a Bernese Mountain Dog may face are malignant histiocytosis, hypomyelinogenesis, progressive retinal atrophy, and possibly cataraacts and hypoadrenocorticism. The breed is also prone to histiocytic sarcoma, a cancer of the muscle tissue that is very aggressive, and hereditary eye diseases are common among larger dogs.

Lifespan:

Compared to breeds of similar size as well as purebred dogs in general, the Bernese is one of the short-lived dog breeds. The average life expectancy of a Bernese Mountain Dog is approximately 7 to 8 years. 

Exercise:

Berners are not suited to apartment or condo life. A home with a large, securely fenced yard is the best choice. Because the Berner is a working dog, he has plenty of energy. In addition to yard play, he needs a minimum of 30 minutes of vigorous exercise every day; three times that amount keeps this sturdy dog in top condition.

With his thick, handsome coat, the Berner is a natural fit for cold climates. He loves to play in the snow. Conversely, with his black coat and large size, he’s prone to heat stroke. Don’t allow him to exercise strenuously when it’s extremely hot; limit exercise to early mornings or evenings, when it’s cooler. Keep him cool during the heat of the day, either inside with fans or air-conditioning or outside in the shade.

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Great Dane

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History:  

Dogs resembling the Great Dane have been seen on Egyptian monuments dating back to 3,000 BC. Extremely large boarhounds resembling the Great Dane appear in ancient Greece; in frescoes from Tiryns dating back to 14th–13th centuries BC. The large boarhound or Molossian hound continues to appear throughout ancient Greece in subsequent centuries right up to the Hellenisticera. The Molossian hound, the Suliot dog and specific imports from Greece were used in the 18th century to increase the stature of the boarhounds in Austria and Germany and the wolfhounds in Ireland.

Bigger dogs are depicted on numerous runestones in Scandinavia, on coinage in Denmark from the 5th century AD and in the collection of Old Norsepoems, known in English as Poetic Edda. The University of Copenhagen Zoological Museum holds at least seven skeletons of very large hunting dogs, dating from the 5th century BC going forward through to the year 1000 AD.

In the 19th century, the dog was known as a “German boarhound” in English speaking countries. Some German breeders tried to introduce the names “German Dogge” and “German Mastiff” on the English market, because they believed the breed should be marketed as a dog of luxury and not as a working dog. However, due to the increasing tensions between Germany and other countries, the dog later became referred to as a “Great Dane”, after the grand danois in Buffon’s Histoire naturelle, générale et particulière in 1755.

Description, Grooming, Color, and Coat:  

The Great Dane is a large German breed of domestic Dog known for its giant size. As described by the American Kennel Club:

The Great Dane combines, in its regal appearance, dignity, strength and elegance with great size and a powerful, well-formed, smoothly muscled body. It is one of the giant working breeds, but is unique in that its general conformation must be so well balanced that it never appears clumsy, and shall move with a long reach and powerful drive. The Great Dane is a short haired breed with a strong galloping figure.

There are three colour varieties with five to six colors of the Great Dane…

The six usual colors of Great Danes’ smooth, short coats are:

  • Fawn (a golden color with a black mask)
  • Brindle (fawn and black intermixed all over the body in a tiger-stripe pattern)
  • Blue (steel blue, which is really a sort of gray)
  • Black
  • Harlequin (white with irregular black patches over the entire body)
  • Mantle (black and white with a solid black blanket over the body)

He sheds a lot, but his coat is easy to keep in top condition with regular brushing. Use a firm bristle brush and shampoo as needed. Regular brushing keeps your Great Dane’s coat healthy and clean, and cuts down on the number of baths he needs.

As you might imagine, bathing a Great Dane is a daunting task, particularly if he’s not looking forward to it. Hard to imagine him hiding under the kitchen table while trying to escape a bath, but it happens.

Brushing your Dane’s teeth  at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.

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Size:  In the ratio between length and height, the Great Dane should be square. Male Great Danes are 30 to 34 inches tall and weigh 120 to 200 pounds. Females are 28 to 32 inches tall and weigh 100 to 130 pounds.

Temperament: The Great Dane’s large and imposing appearance belies its friendly nature. They are known for seeking physical affection with their owners, and the breed is often referred to as a “gentle giant”.

Great Danes are generally well disposed toward other dogs, other non-canine pets, and familiar humans. They generally do not exhibit extreme aggressiveness or a high prey drive. The Great Dane is a very gentle and loving animal and with the proper care and training is great around children, especially when being raised with them. However, if not properly socialized a Great Dane may become fearful or aggressive towards new stimuli, such as strangers and new environments.

Great Danes are a breed recommended for families provided that they get trained early and onwards, regarded by animal experts due to their preference for sitting on and leaning against owners as ‘the world’s biggest Lapdog”

Health:  Great Danes are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they’re prone to certain health conditions. Not all Danes will get any or all of these diseases, but it’s important to be aware of them if you’re considering this breed. Hip dysplasia, gastric torsion, bone cancer, and heart disease are a few thing to watch for.

Exercise:  Like most dogs, Great Danes require daily walks to maintain their health. However, it is important not to over exercise this breed, particularly when young. Great Dane puppies grow very large, very fast, which puts them at risk of joint and bone problems. Because of a puppy’s natural energy, Dane owners often take steps to minimize activity while the dog is still growing.

Lifespan:  Under 10 years but most live till about 7-8 years.

Sites used:  

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/greatdane.htm

http://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/great-dane/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Dane

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Wheaten Terrier

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History:  

In Ireland, the terrier was the poor man’s dog, a versatile farm dog who could rid the place of vermin, do a little hunting, and help guard the property against intruders, both animal and human.

Much of the Wheaten’s early history wasn’t recorded, but he probably shares a common ancestor with the Kerry Blue Terrier and the Irish Terrier. They also share a sign that they were working dogs: a docked tail, which told the tax collector that they were exempt from the tax on dogs.

The Wheaten wasn’t recognized as a breed by the Irish Kennel Club until 1937, on St. Patrick’s Day. To win a championship, he was required to qualify in field trials, with rats, rabbits, and badgers as prey, a rule that’s since gone by the wayside.

The first Wheatens arrived in the U.S. in November of 1946. A Boston Globe Post report listed seven of them among the cargo of the freighter Norman J. Coleman, which docked in Boston after journeying from Belfast. Two of the pups went home with Lydia Vogel of Springfield, Massachusetts. Vogel showed them the next year at the Westminster Kennel Club show, and they produced 17 puppies.

It wasn’t until 1962, however, that the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Club of America was founded in Brooklyn. Naturally, the first meeting took place on St. Patrick’s Day. Attendees included three canine pioneers of the breed: Holmenocks Gramachree, Gads Hill, and Holmenocks Hallmark.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized the breed in 1973, and Holmenocks Gramachree became the first Wheaten to be registered by the AKC. Today, the breed ranks 62nd in popularity among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Description:

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier. The moderately long head is rectangular in appearance and in proportion with the body. The strong muzzle is relatively short compared to the skull and has a defined stop. The black nose is large for the size of the dog. The teeth meet in a scissors bite and the lips are black. The wide-set eyes are almond shaped and come in a reddish brown to a medium brown color. Light or yellow eye color can occur but is a breed fault in the written standard. The V-shaped ears fold forward and are level with the skull. The medium-length neck gradually widens into the body. The back is straight, forming a level topline. The front legs are straight and the paws are compact and round with black toenails. The high-set tail is either docked or kept natural. Note: docking tails is illegal in most parts of Europe. Dewclaws are usually removed. The single, wavy coat comes in shades of wheaten. Puppies are born dark brown and lighten to the final adult wheaten color by age two. There are two coat varieties, the American and the Irish. The Irish coat tends to be thinner and silkier.

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Temperament:

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is strong, agile and well-coordinated. It is a happy, playful, spirited and friendly terrier. Alert, it makes a great watchdog and barks at the arrival of guests. It is usually very loving with children and gets along reasonably well with other dogs. An unsocialized dog with a meek owner who does not know how and when to correct negative behaviors may end up with a dog-aggressive dog. Some of these dogs that were not raised with cats may not get along well with them. All it takes is some fast movement on the part of the cat, and the dog’s instincts will take over and he will chase them. The dog needs to be corrected right before it takes off after the cat. These dogs have a puppy attitude that remains with them throughout their lives. They are sweet-tempered, docile and self-confident. This breed needs to be taught, preferably when young, but older dogs can learn what is and is not acceptable behavior. It is very intelligent, so it will generally grasp quickly what is required of it. It has a straightforward nature and needs to be handled in a straightforward manner. Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers bond closely with their family. They seldom bark unnecessarily. The Soft Coated Wheaten should be well socialized with other dogs while it is a young puppy, but adults can learn what is unacceptable behavior if they have an owner who properly communicates with them. In order to have a well-behaved Wheaten, you must be firm, but calm, consistent and confident with the dog. Meek owners will find the dog will easily take over the home and will be hard to control. Do not allow this dog to jump on humans. Jumping dogs are not “greeting” the human. Jumping is a respect and a dominancy issue.

Size:

Height: Males 18 – 20 inches and Females 17 – 19 inches

Weight: Males 35 – 45 pounds and Females 30 – 40 pounds

Life Span: 12 to 15 years

Health:   Prone to protein wasting disease and flea allergies.

Exercise:   Wheaten Terriers are very active dogs they need to go on daily walk.

Grooming:

 When grooming the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, the object is to achieve a natural look, and brushing can make the soft coat fuzzy. So using a brush is not recommended. Instead, frequent, even daily, combing of the long, profuse coat with a medium-toothed comb is recommended to keep it free of tangles—beginning when the dog is a puppy. Clean the eyes and check the ears carefully. Bathe or dry shampoo when necessary. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier does not shed in the spring and fall, but loose hair should be combed out of the coat from time to time. A well-groomed dog will shed very little. This breed is good for allergy suffers.

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http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/softcoatedwheatenterrier.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft-coated_Wheaten_Terrierhttp://

http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/dogs-101/videos/soft-coated-wheaten-terrier/