Wheaten Terrier

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History:  

In Ireland, the terrier was the poor man’s dog, a versatile farm dog who could rid the place of vermin, do a little hunting, and help guard the property against intruders, both animal and human.

Much of the Wheaten’s early history wasn’t recorded, but he probably shares a common ancestor with the Kerry Blue Terrier and the Irish Terrier. They also share a sign that they were working dogs: a docked tail, which told the tax collector that they were exempt from the tax on dogs.

The Wheaten wasn’t recognized as a breed by the Irish Kennel Club until 1937, on St. Patrick’s Day. To win a championship, he was required to qualify in field trials, with rats, rabbits, and badgers as prey, a rule that’s since gone by the wayside.

The first Wheatens arrived in the U.S. in November of 1946. A Boston Globe Post report listed seven of them among the cargo of the freighter Norman J. Coleman, which docked in Boston after journeying from Belfast. Two of the pups went home with Lydia Vogel of Springfield, Massachusetts. Vogel showed them the next year at the Westminster Kennel Club show, and they produced 17 puppies.

It wasn’t until 1962, however, that the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Club of America was founded in Brooklyn. Naturally, the first meeting took place on St. Patrick’s Day. Attendees included three canine pioneers of the breed: Holmenocks Gramachree, Gads Hill, and Holmenocks Hallmark.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized the breed in 1973, and Holmenocks Gramachree became the first Wheaten to be registered by the AKC. Today, the breed ranks 62nd in popularity among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Description:

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier. The moderately long head is rectangular in appearance and in proportion with the body. The strong muzzle is relatively short compared to the skull and has a defined stop. The black nose is large for the size of the dog. The teeth meet in a scissors bite and the lips are black. The wide-set eyes are almond shaped and come in a reddish brown to a medium brown color. Light or yellow eye color can occur but is a breed fault in the written standard. The V-shaped ears fold forward and are level with the skull. The medium-length neck gradually widens into the body. The back is straight, forming a level topline. The front legs are straight and the paws are compact and round with black toenails. The high-set tail is either docked or kept natural. Note: docking tails is illegal in most parts of Europe. Dewclaws are usually removed. The single, wavy coat comes in shades of wheaten. Puppies are born dark brown and lighten to the final adult wheaten color by age two. There are two coat varieties, the American and the Irish. The Irish coat tends to be thinner and silkier.

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Temperament:

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is strong, agile and well-coordinated. It is a happy, playful, spirited and friendly terrier. Alert, it makes a great watchdog and barks at the arrival of guests. It is usually very loving with children and gets along reasonably well with other dogs. An unsocialized dog with a meek owner who does not know how and when to correct negative behaviors may end up with a dog-aggressive dog. Some of these dogs that were not raised with cats may not get along well with them. All it takes is some fast movement on the part of the cat, and the dog’s instincts will take over and he will chase them. The dog needs to be corrected right before it takes off after the cat. These dogs have a puppy attitude that remains with them throughout their lives. They are sweet-tempered, docile and self-confident. This breed needs to be taught, preferably when young, but older dogs can learn what is and is not acceptable behavior. It is very intelligent, so it will generally grasp quickly what is required of it. It has a straightforward nature and needs to be handled in a straightforward manner. Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers bond closely with their family. They seldom bark unnecessarily. The Soft Coated Wheaten should be well socialized with other dogs while it is a young puppy, but adults can learn what is unacceptable behavior if they have an owner who properly communicates with them. In order to have a well-behaved Wheaten, you must be firm, but calm, consistent and confident with the dog. Meek owners will find the dog will easily take over the home and will be hard to control. Do not allow this dog to jump on humans. Jumping dogs are not “greeting” the human. Jumping is a respect and a dominancy issue.

Size:

Height: Males 18 – 20 inches and Females 17 – 19 inches

Weight: Males 35 – 45 pounds and Females 30 – 40 pounds

Life Span: 12 to 15 years

Health:   Prone to protein wasting disease and flea allergies.

Exercise:   Wheaten Terriers are very active dogs they need to go on daily walk.

Grooming:

 When grooming the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, the object is to achieve a natural look, and brushing can make the soft coat fuzzy. So using a brush is not recommended. Instead, frequent, even daily, combing of the long, profuse coat with a medium-toothed comb is recommended to keep it free of tangles—beginning when the dog is a puppy. Clean the eyes and check the ears carefully. Bathe or dry shampoo when necessary. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier does not shed in the spring and fall, but loose hair should be combed out of the coat from time to time. A well-groomed dog will shed very little. This breed is good for allergy suffers.

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http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/softcoatedwheatenterrier.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft-coated_Wheaten_Terrierhttp://

http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/dogs-101/videos/soft-coated-wheaten-terrier/

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Border Collie

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History:  The Border Collie was bred around the England and Scotland border.  Shepherds needed a companion that was hard-working, dedicated, and athletic.  After combining a few different traits, then end result was a Border Collie.  This breed is considered the best dog to have when herding livestock.

Description:  Border Collies are a medium-sized herding dog.  They have a space between their shoulder blades which allows them to get into their “stalking” position when hearing.  It almost reminds me of a cat trying to sneak up on its prey. Another notable characteristic is when they give you “the eye”.  You could almost call this a Border Collie’s tunnel vision.

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Temperament & Exercise:  Border Collies are a very driven, focused and a high-energy breed.  Some even say that they are in the “Top 3” of intelligent dogs.  Border Collies were bread to herd animals and focus on the task at hand. These dogs can make a great addition to your family; but before you bring them home there a few things to consider.  Owner’s should probably live in a house with a fenced in back yard.  BC’s require lots of exercise and will need space to play.  Also, if you are new to owning a dog, this would not be the best choice on your first dog.

These dogs are very active and energetic.  As the owner, you need to make sure you spend time to play and give these dogs a good work out, and by work out, I don’t just mean a walk around the block.  It’s very important that you take time to train your Border Collie.  They are very smart and can become destructive if they get bored. Take some time to  research training methods or even enrolling in a class could be beneficial to your and your dog.

Health: Overall, the Border Collie is considered a healthy breed. They tend to have hip dysplasia and an eye disease, Collie Eye Anomaly (CEA).  There is a test that can be done to determine if a breeder will have pups with this disease.

**The site below goes into more detail on CEA**

http://www.petmd.com/dog/conditions/eyes/c_dg_collie_eye_anomaly

Life Span: On average, theses active dogs live up to 10-13 years.

Grooming:  Border Collies are ranked low on the maintenance scale.  They are double coated and require regular brushing. The two types of coats are medium- rough and the short- smooth coat.  The common coat color for Border Collies is white and black, but they also have a variety of other patterns.

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Fun Fact:  There was a Border Collie that played in the movie “Babe”.

Sources: 

http://www.akc.org/dog-breeds/border-collie/

http://www.dogzer.net/blog/3091-broken-city/ (image)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Border_Collie

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History:  

The Greyhound is an ancient breed that originated in the Middle East and North Africa and has won the admiration of many different cultures. Greyhounds have been mentioned by Greeks, depicted in art by Egyptians, praised by a Roman poet, and are the only breed of dog mentioned in the Bible.

Greyhounds found their way into Europe during the Dark Ages. They were so respected for their hunting prowess that the laws of the time protected royal game reserves by forbidding anyone living within 10 miles of the king’s forests from owning a Greyhound.

The Greyhound’s popularity continued to grow in England, thanks to the popularity of coursing (the sport of chasing prey) and racing. Spanish explorers and British colonists brought them to the Americas where they thrived as well, coursing jackrabbits and coyotes on the wide-open plains.

The Greyhound was one of the first breeds to appear in American dog shows, and the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1885. The first official coursing race took place in 1886, and the National Coursing Association in the United States was founded in 1906. Greyhound racing took off and is popular today in many states, although it’s a controversial sport because so many dogs are abandoned, euthenized, or sold to laboratories if they don’t do well at the track.

Size:  The Greyhound is a sleek, athletic dog. There are two types, which vary somewhat in size: Racing Greyhounds are usually 25 to 29 inches tall, and show Greyhounds are slightly larger, at 26 to 30 inches in height. In both types, males typically weigh 65 to 85 pounds, females 50 to 65 pounds, with racing dogs tending toward the lower end of the scale.

Exercise: Greyhounds that are kept as pets should have regular opportunities to run free on open ground in a safe area, as well as daily long, brisk walks, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead. In a dog’s mind the leader leads the way and that leader needs to be the human. Greyhounds love a regular routine.

Temperament:  The Greyhound is brave and devoted. Intelligent, laid-back, charming and loving, its character is often undervalued because of its reserved behavior toward strangers and even its master. Greyhounds are sensitive to the tone of one’s voice and will not listen if they sense that they are stronger minded than their owner, however they will also not respond well to harsh discipline. Owners need to be calm, yet possess an air of natural authority. Socialize well to prevent timidity. As a rule, they are gentle and even-tempered—both racing lines and show lines. Most Greyhounds have a definite prey drive. It is instinctive for these dogs to chase anything that moves quickly. They are extremely fast and some will kill cats and other domestic animals, although this is not the majority (only about 20% of ex-racers are too “keen” on chasing prey to ever be safe with small animals). About 10% are immediately okay due to low prey instinct, and the rest can be trained to leave cats and other small pets in the home alone. They seldom present difficulties with other dogs and are normally good with children, though they do not usually like roughhouse play, and would not be a good choice for young children who are looking for a playmate. Indoors, these dogs are calm and sociable to a point where they can even be considered lazy. They bond strongly with their own people, have tremendous stamina, and do not bark much. Show lines tend to be of a different body style than racing lines, and are often more angulated. Racing lines are bred for performance, but often a good by-product is that they are friendly, outgoing dogs that make wonderful pets when their racing days are over. Greyhounds are not particularly vigilant. Show lines tend to be a bit heavier and bred more for temperament than racing lines, which are bred for speed. However, racing lines also make wonderful pets. There are hundreds of adoption groups all over North America, Europe and Australia to place these gentle, loving dogs when they retire. Retired racing Greyhounds are not usually difficult tohousebreak. They are already crate trained from the track, so it doesn’t take them long to learn that they are not to “go” in the house. The Greyhound needs an even-tempered, gentle but firm loving owner who knows how to consistently communicate the rules of the home. A Greyhound that knows his place in his pack and what is expected of him is a happy Greyhound.

Health:  Prone to bloat. It is better to feed them 2 or 3 small meals rather than one large one. They are sensitive to drugs, including insecticides. They are also prone to hypothyroidism, Osteosarcoma, and Anesthesia Sensitivity.

Description: The Greyhound is a tall, slender dog. The head is long and narrow, wide between the ears, with a long tapering muzzle. There is no stop. The small rose ears are held back and folded, and are semi-perked when they are excited. The eyes are dark in color. The slightly arched neck is long. The legs are long with the front legs being perfectly straight. The chest is wide and deep. The long tail tapers with a slight upward curve. The short, fine coat comes in all colors. 

Coat, color, and Grooming: 

Greyhounds have a short, smooth coat that’s easy to care for. Despite their name, they can be any color, including fawn, black, red, blue, gray, or white. They can also be various shades of brindle, a striped pattern that gives them the look of having just streaked across the African savanna, or white with at least one other color, known as particolor.

Despite their short coat, Greyhounds shed. Brush them daily to keep shedding at a manageable level. Your Greyhound will love being massaged with a rubber curry brush, also known as a hound mitt. Use a dry dog shampoo when you bathe him to keep his coat clean and smelling great.

Keep ears clean and free of debris with a moist cotton ball. Never insert anything into the ear canal; just clean around the outer ear.

This breed’s teeth need the most dedicated care. Greyhounds tend to have poor dental health, so regular brushing is a must if you want them to have sweet breath and no ugly tartar buildup.

Trim his nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn’t wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they’re too long. Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and if you cut too far you can cause bleeding — and your dog may not cooperate the next time he sees the nail clippers come out. So, if you’re not experienced trimming dog nails, ask a vet or groomer for pointers.

His ears should be checked weekly for redness or a bad odor, which can indicate an infection. When you check your dog’s ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections. Don’t insert anything into the ear canal; just clean the outer ear.

Begin accustoming your Greyhound to being brushed and examined when he’s a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.

As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Eyes should be clear, with no redness or discharge. Your careful weekly exam will help you spot potential health problems early.

Lifespan: About 10-12 years.

Beagle

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History: The actual origin of the Beagle seems to be obscure with no reliable documentation on the earliest days of development.  The modern Beagle can be traced in ancient Greece back in the 5th century BC. Then in 1888, the National Beagle Club was formed and held its first trial. Beagles are still used today hunting in packs and larger hare.

Description: Beagles are known for there colors they are usually Brown, Tan, and white. The beagles coat is  of medium length, close, hard, sleek and easy to care for.

Size: Males are 22-25 pounds Females 20-23 pounds Height is 13-16 inches

Temperament: Beagles are very happy go lucky dogs. They don’t have much of a temper. They are good family dogs and good with kids. 

Grooming: Brush with a firm bristle brush, and bath with mild soap only when necessary. Check the ears for signs of infection. They are a average shedder. 

Exercise: Beagles are very energetic dogs. They need lots of exercise. You should give them a brisk walk daily. Always use a lead when walking or you may just find yourself chasing after them. 

Health: Beagles are very healthy dogs. Some lines can be prone to epilepsy but can be controlled with medicine.

Lifespan: Beagles lifespan are 12-15 years

Sources: http://Www.wikipeia.org, http://www.dogbreedinfo.com, http://www.akc.org

Bloodhound

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History:  It’s not for certain when or where the dogs originated.  There has been reports (legends) that Belgium monks developed this breed in a monastery around the 8th century.  The Bloodhound was first known as the Saint Hubert, named after the monastery from which they were born.  The Saint Hubert came in two colors, black or white.

The monks later sent a pair of black Saint Hubert’s to the King of France as a gift.  This is when they were bred with other dogs and began to get the brown/black color.

Bloodhounds weren’t recognized in the United States until the 1800’s.  They were known to be a great tracking and hunting breed.  They would help their master locate missing-persons, or  wild game.

Description:  These dogs are fairly large dogs with an elongated gait.  They have lots of saggy skin, which helps them pick up scents off the ground while tracking.  Their long ears are known to help gather scents too .  Their primary colors are black/tan or liver/tan.

Size:  Their average weight is 80-100lbs and they stand about 23-27 inches at the shoulder.

Temperament:  This breed can be a great family pet, but they are known to be stubborn.  Since the BH was bread to sniff and track, it becomes hard for them to listen when they find a scent.  You may find it hard to get their attention once they are on a trail.  Another trait is that they might overpower young children if they are left alone with them.  Otherwise, if you train them at a young age, Bloodhounds make great family pets.

Grooming:  The Bloodhound requires a little more time when it comes to grooming.  Since they are always outdoors sniffing around, they tend to get dirty.  You can brush them daily to remove dirt and excess slobber.  Their ears need to be cleaned daily because they can get into the food, water dish, and pick up all sorts of stuff off the ground.  If not taken care of, their ears can get infected from bacteria.

Health:  Bloodhounds are known to bloat. This is when the stomach fills with air from eating or drinking. It’s important to provide them with an elevated food bowl and feed them in two separate meals.

Like most large dog breeds, Bloodhounds are prone to hip and elbow dysplasia.  Bloodhounds also have been known to have a few eye issues.  Entropion, is when their eyelid forms inward, causing the eyelashes to scratch the eyeball.  The opposite would be ectropion, where the eyelid forms outward.  Then the last condition is keratoconjuntivitis sicca, also known as dry eyes.

Not all Bloodhounds are going to have these conditions.  If you are planning on getting your dog from a breeder, make sure you ask them if the parents of the pups have been tested, and always make sure that the blood lines are clean.

Exercise:  Bloodhounds were bread to track a scent for 100’s of miles; with that being said, it’s very important for them to get exercise.  If you are wanting one of these dogs, make sure you have a fenced in backyard, a sturdy leash/harness, and plenty of time to play with your dog.  When Bloodhounds get bored, they become destructive.  They love to eat and chew on anything.  Some owners have said they are great at remodeling your backyard. Remember, a happy Bloodhound make a happy owner 🙂

Lifespan: Around 8-10 years.

Trivia:  The Bloodhounds have been known to play large roles on the big screen. They have appeared in movies such as Lady & the Tramp, Aristocats, Shawshank Redemption, & etc.

Sources:

http://www.petmd.com/dog/breeds/c_dg_bloodhound

http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/bloodhound

http://www.petmd.com/dog/breeds/c_dg_bloodhound

Breed of the Month: Golden Retriever

 

Description: Golden Retrievers are strong, large, long-hair dogs. Their inner coat provides warmth while spending time outdoors, and their top coat helps to keep out water. The color of the coat is golden, red, and slightly wavy. Golden’s have dark eyes, a strong jaw, and muscular neck.

History: The Golden Retriever originated in Scotland and was developed by Lord Tweedmouth. He bred a yellow retriever with a tweed water spaniel, which is now extinct. Later on the Irish setter and the Bloodhound were bred into the mix, which helped to create the Golden Retriever we see today.

Size: Males weigh an average of 65-70lbs and are 23-24 inches tall. Females weigh 60-70lbs and are about 21 1/2 – 22 1/2 inches tall.

Temperament: Golden’s are very loyal and loving dogs. They are ranked the 3rd most popular family dog in the United States. Most Golden’s are known for their kind and friendly temperament. This breed is known for many different jobs. Golden’s make great service dogs for the blind and deaf, but also great hunting companions. Golden’s great around children.

Grooming: They should be brushed once a week and every day during heavy shedding. This helps prevent the amount of hair shed. Golden’s should be bathed about every two months. It is also important to keep their ears clean. This helps to prevent ear infections.

Health: In 1998, a study was done by the Golden Retriever Club of America. It was found that 61.4 percent of Golden’s died from cancer. Due to Golden’s having a large appetite, they are prone to obesity. Golden’s also have hip and elbow dysplasia, cataracts, heart disease, joint disease, and ligament rupture. Due to having a large list of health issues, it is recommended that you take them in for yearly vet checkups.

Exercise: The Golden should have a daily exercise routine. They enjoy being active outdoors. Taking them for walks, playing fetch, or even participating in an agility course are just a few examples. Golden’s also enjoy relaxing, it is important for them to enjoy their free time too.

Lifespan: About 10 to 13 years.

Trivia: Golden Retrievers have made special appearances in films such as Homeward bound, as ‘Shadow’ and the Air Bud series as ‘Buddy’.

http://www.goldenretrievers.co.uk/application/standard/index.php

https://www.akc.org/breeds/golden_retriever/index.cfm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Retriever

http://www.petmd.com/dog/breeds/c_dg_golden_retriever