Wheaten Terrier

images

History:  

In Ireland, the terrier was the poor man’s dog, a versatile farm dog who could rid the place of vermin, do a little hunting, and help guard the property against intruders, both animal and human.

Much of the Wheaten’s early history wasn’t recorded, but he probably shares a common ancestor with the Kerry Blue Terrier and the Irish Terrier. They also share a sign that they were working dogs: a docked tail, which told the tax collector that they were exempt from the tax on dogs.

The Wheaten wasn’t recognized as a breed by the Irish Kennel Club until 1937, on St. Patrick’s Day. To win a championship, he was required to qualify in field trials, with rats, rabbits, and badgers as prey, a rule that’s since gone by the wayside.

The first Wheatens arrived in the U.S. in November of 1946. A Boston Globe Post report listed seven of them among the cargo of the freighter Norman J. Coleman, which docked in Boston after journeying from Belfast. Two of the pups went home with Lydia Vogel of Springfield, Massachusetts. Vogel showed them the next year at the Westminster Kennel Club show, and they produced 17 puppies.

It wasn’t until 1962, however, that the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Club of America was founded in Brooklyn. Naturally, the first meeting took place on St. Patrick’s Day. Attendees included three canine pioneers of the breed: Holmenocks Gramachree, Gads Hill, and Holmenocks Hallmark.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognized the breed in 1973, and Holmenocks Gramachree became the first Wheaten to be registered by the AKC. Today, the breed ranks 62nd in popularity among the 155 breeds and varieties recognized by the AKC.

Description:

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier. The moderately long head is rectangular in appearance and in proportion with the body. The strong muzzle is relatively short compared to the skull and has a defined stop. The black nose is large for the size of the dog. The teeth meet in a scissors bite and the lips are black. The wide-set eyes are almond shaped and come in a reddish brown to a medium brown color. Light or yellow eye color can occur but is a breed fault in the written standard. The V-shaped ears fold forward and are level with the skull. The medium-length neck gradually widens into the body. The back is straight, forming a level topline. The front legs are straight and the paws are compact and round with black toenails. The high-set tail is either docked or kept natural. Note: docking tails is illegal in most parts of Europe. Dewclaws are usually removed. The single, wavy coat comes in shades of wheaten. Puppies are born dark brown and lighten to the final adult wheaten color by age two. There are two coat varieties, the American and the Irish. The Irish coat tends to be thinner and silkier.

images-2

Temperament:

The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is strong, agile and well-coordinated. It is a happy, playful, spirited and friendly terrier. Alert, it makes a great watchdog and barks at the arrival of guests. It is usually very loving with children and gets along reasonably well with other dogs. An unsocialized dog with a meek owner who does not know how and when to correct negative behaviors may end up with a dog-aggressive dog. Some of these dogs that were not raised with cats may not get along well with them. All it takes is some fast movement on the part of the cat, and the dog’s instincts will take over and he will chase them. The dog needs to be corrected right before it takes off after the cat. These dogs have a puppy attitude that remains with them throughout their lives. They are sweet-tempered, docile and self-confident. This breed needs to be taught, preferably when young, but older dogs can learn what is and is not acceptable behavior. It is very intelligent, so it will generally grasp quickly what is required of it. It has a straightforward nature and needs to be handled in a straightforward manner. Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers bond closely with their family. They seldom bark unnecessarily. The Soft Coated Wheaten should be well socialized with other dogs while it is a young puppy, but adults can learn what is unacceptable behavior if they have an owner who properly communicates with them. In order to have a well-behaved Wheaten, you must be firm, but calm, consistent and confident with the dog. Meek owners will find the dog will easily take over the home and will be hard to control. Do not allow this dog to jump on humans. Jumping dogs are not “greeting” the human. Jumping is a respect and a dominancy issue.

Size:

Height: Males 18 – 20 inches and Females 17 – 19 inches

Weight: Males 35 – 45 pounds and Females 30 – 40 pounds

Life Span: 12 to 15 years

Health:   Prone to protein wasting disease and flea allergies.

Exercise:   Wheaten Terriers are very active dogs they need to go on daily walk.

Grooming:

 When grooming the Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, the object is to achieve a natural look, and brushing can make the soft coat fuzzy. So using a brush is not recommended. Instead, frequent, even daily, combing of the long, profuse coat with a medium-toothed comb is recommended to keep it free of tangles—beginning when the dog is a puppy. Clean the eyes and check the ears carefully. Bathe or dry shampoo when necessary. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier does not shed in the spring and fall, but loose hair should be combed out of the coat from time to time. A well-groomed dog will shed very little. This breed is good for allergy suffers.

images-1

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/softcoatedwheatenterrier.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft-coated_Wheaten_Terrierhttp://

http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/dogs-101/videos/soft-coated-wheaten-terrier/

Advertisements

Cockapoo

images

History:  

A Cockapoo can be the result of mating either the American Cocker Spaniel or English Cocker Spaniel with a Poodle. They have been known in the United States since the 1950s. The Cockapoo is not very well recognized.

Health:

Not all Cockapoos will get any or all of these diseases, but
it’s important to be aware of them if you’re considering this breed. Cataracts
Patellar Luxation
Hip Dysplasia
Allergies
Liver Disease
Ear Infections

If you’re buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy’s parents. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.

In Cockapoos, you should expect to see health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease; from Auburn University for thrombopathia; and from the Canine Eye Registry Foundation (CERF) certifying that eyes are normal. You can confirm health clearances by checking the OFA web site (offa.org).

Health clearances are not issued to dogs younger than 2 years of age. That’s because some health problems don’t appear until a dog reaches full maturity. For this reason, it’s often recommended that dogs not be bred until they are two or three years old.

Size

  • The Teacup Toy is less than 6 pounds in weight and less than 10 inches in height.
  • The Toy Cockapoo can reach 10 inches in height but has a sturdier build, the bigger ones tipping the scales at just under 12 pounds.
  • The Miniature Cockapoo weighs 13 to 18 pounds and ranges between 11 and 14 inches high.
  • The Standard or Maxi Cockapoo should weigh more than 19 pounds and be at least 15 inches in height

Personality

Intelligent and easy to please, the Cockapoo was established as a companion dog. They’re friendly and happy, happy, happy. He has an outgoing nature and usually gets along with everyone. Depending on his temperament, they can be active or they can simply enjoy snuggling up on the couch with you.

They have the intelligence of Poodles forebears but also the sweet disposition of his Cocker Spaniel ancestry. If the parents don’t have the loving quality that is expected in a Cockapoo, then their offspring won’t either.

Like every dog, the Cockapoo needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Cockapoo puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog.

They prefer, always, to be with their family and can suffer from separation anxiety when left alone for too long. They can be easy to train, though that’s dependent on the parents’ temperament. Positive reinforcement is the best way to train a Cockapoo; They can achieve high levels of obedience with time and patience.

Care

Most Cockapoos have a moderate level of energy, but that doesn’t mean they’ll laze around all day. They enjoy a good walk — and need it to keep them from becomingoverweight. The best type of exercise, though, is a good play session in the backyard. Expect him to need at least 15 minutes of exercise every day.

The Cockapoo is an adaptable breed. He can live in an apartment, though the smaller varieties seem to do better there than do the Maxi or Standard Cockapoos. None of them should live outdoors or in kennels, since they’ve been bred to be companion dogs. They thrive when with their family and can suffer from separation anxiety when left for long periods of time — and that can lead to excessive barking and todestructive behavior.

Crate training benefits every dog and is a kind way to ensure that your Cockapoo doesn’t have accidents in the house or get into things he shouldn’t. A crate is also a place where he can retreat for a nap. Crate training at a young age will also help your Cockapoo accept confinement if he ever needs to be boarded or hospitalized.

Don’t stick your Cockapoo in a crate all day long, however. It’s not a jail, and he shouldn’t spend more than a few hours at a time in it except when he’s sleeping at night (although he would much prefer your bed). Cockapoos are people dogs, and they aren’t meant to spend their lives locked up in a crate or kennel.

Coat, color and grooming 

The Cockapoo has a single, long coat that can range from straight to loose curls, but it shouldn’t be kinky. Cockapoos can be found in all the colors and color combinations that are seen in both Cocker Spaniels and Poodles — a more rich variety of coat colors than is usual in many other breeds.

The Cockapoo is usually seen au naturel, but many people like to clip the coat. However, it should only be trimmed to two to three inches in length. Hair around the eyes should be trimmed to allow visibility, so he’s not doing an impression of an Old English Sheepdog. The coat should be brushed daily.

Although it’s different for every Cockapoo, a puppy resulting from a multigenerational breeding is supposed to be odorless and nonshedding (although “nonshedding” is a fantasy, since every dog on the planet sheds at least a tiny bit). To retain coat oils and health, he only need be bathed when absolutely necessary.

Because his floppy Cocker ears block air circulation, the ears must be checked and cleaned weekly to prevent ear infections. Gently wipe out the ear — only the part you can see! — with a cotton ball moistened with a cleaning solution recommended by your veterinarian. (Don’t stick cotton swabs or anything else into the ear canal, because that could damage it.) Your Cockapoo may have an ear infection if the inside of the ear smells bad, looks red or seems tender, or he frequently shakes his head or scratches at his ear.

Brush your Cockapoo’s teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Daily brushing is even better if you want to prevent gum disease and bad breath.

Trim nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn’t wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems. If you can hear them clicking on the floor, they’re too long. Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and if you cut too far you can cause bleeding — and your dog may not cooperate the next time he sees the nail clippers come out. So, if you’re not experienced trimming dog nails, ask a vet or groomer for pointers.

Begin accustoming your Cockapoo to being brushed and examined when he’s a puppy. Handle his paws frequently — dogs are touchy about their feet — and look inside his mouth. Make grooming a positive experience filled with praise and rewards, and you’ll lay the groundwork for easy veterinary exams and other handling when he’s an adult.

As you groom, check for sores, rashes, or signs of infection such as redness, tenderness, or inflammation on the skin, in the nose, mouth, and eyes, and on the feet. Eyes should be clear, with no redness or discharge. Your careful weekly exam will help you spot potential health problems early.

Lifespan

A Cockapoo’s lifespan is 12 to 15 years.

American Foxhound

images

History: When the first European settlers arrived in the American colonies, some of them brought their hounds with. In the late 1700’s, the descendents of these dogs were bred with imported Irish, English, and French hounds. The American breeders were aiming to develop a Foxhound that would be lighter, taller and faster than his English cousin, with a keener sense of smell, to better suit the game and terrain of their new country.

George Washington was among the early American breeders. He kept a pack of American Foxhounds at Mount Vernon and tried to improve his dogs by breeding them to imported British hounds.  He also bred them to French foxhounds given to him by a friend.

These days, there are four types of American Foxhounds: field trial hounds, which are known for their speed and competitive spirit; slow-trailling hounds, which are known for their musical baying and used for hunting foxes on foot; drag hounds, also known as trail hounds, which are raced or hunted using as artificial lure instead of real prey; and pack hounds, used by hunters on horseback in packs of 15 to 20 or more.

Description: Similar to its English cousin, the American Foxhound has been developed by its breeders to be lighter and taller, to have a keener sense of smell, and to be even faster in a chase. A large handsome hound, its front legs are long and very straight-boned. The head is long with a slightly domed, large skull. THe ears are broad and pendant, framing the face. The eyes are large and wide-set, either brown or hazel, with a sweet, imploring expression. The ears are wide and flat to the head. The tail is set moderately high with a slight upward curve, but is not turned forward over the back. The short, hard coat may be any color.

Size: Height: 21-25 inches

Weight: 65-75 pounds

Temperament: The American Foxhound is sweet, affectionate, gentle and loving at home, but they are also brave and intense warrior in the hunt. They are excellent with children and get along well with other dogs because of their pack-hunting background, but should not be trusted with non-canine pets. Friendliness to strangers varies widely. They are very friendly dogs, however if a particular dog is allowed to see himself as a pack leader to humans he may become protective. The American Foxhound will take off after an interesting scent if it gets a chance. They like to bay and have a melodious bark; so in fact, that its tones have been used in popular sogns. Foxhounds don’t always make good house pets due to their history as outdoor pack kennel hounds. Make sure to provide plenty of exercise.

Grooming: The smooth, short-haired coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush, and shampoo only when necessary. This breed is an average shedder.

Lifespan: About 10-12 years An average litter size is 5-7 puppies.

Health Problems: This breed doesn’t have much for health problems. its a fairly healthy breed. They are free of many genetic diseases, such as hip and bone problems, that plague other large breeds. Gains weight easily; do not overfeed.

Beagle

images

History: The actual origin of the Beagle seems to be obscure with no reliable documentation on the earliest days of development.  The modern Beagle can be traced in ancient Greece back in the 5th century BC. Then in 1888, the National Beagle Club was formed and held its first trial. Beagles are still used today hunting in packs and larger hare.

Description: Beagles are known for there colors they are usually Brown, Tan, and white. The beagles coat is  of medium length, close, hard, sleek and easy to care for.

Size: Males are 22-25 pounds Females 20-23 pounds Height is 13-16 inches

Temperament: Beagles are very happy go lucky dogs. They don’t have much of a temper. They are good family dogs and good with kids. 

Grooming: Brush with a firm bristle brush, and bath with mild soap only when necessary. Check the ears for signs of infection. They are a average shedder. 

Exercise: Beagles are very energetic dogs. They need lots of exercise. You should give them a brisk walk daily. Always use a lead when walking or you may just find yourself chasing after them. 

Health: Beagles are very healthy dogs. Some lines can be prone to epilepsy but can be controlled with medicine.

Lifespan: Beagles lifespan are 12-15 years

Sources: http://Www.wikipeia.org, http://www.dogbreedinfo.com, http://www.akc.org

Weimaraner

WeimaranerGianni3Months

 

 History:  They originated in Germany around the late 1800’s.  This breed was developed for the Grand Duke, Karl August of Wiemar. These dogs were taught to hunt very large game such as boars, bears, and deer.  Both Germany and The Duke were very possessive of the new breed they had created.  It was said that the first Weimaraners to enter the United States were sterile that way no one could breed these dogs.  Unfortunately, The Dukes plan didn’t work out so well. A man from Rhode Island went to Germany and returned to the US with 3 dogs.  He bread the dogs and shared them with people across the US.

Description:  The Weimaraner is a medium sized dog.  Generally the owners will have the tails docked, but this has been banned in some countries.  Their coats are grayish-silver and can be long or short-haired.  Their eyes start out blue when they are pups, but then change to an amber or light gray color.  These dogs also have webbed toes, which helps them get around better in the water.

Size: For being a large dog, the Weimaraner doesn’t weigh that much. Females are 23-25 inches tall, weighing in around 55-70lbs.  Males are 25-27 inches tall, weighing 70-80lbs.

Temperament:  These guys have been called the dogs with a human brain.  Weimaraner’s are easy to train, but it’s best to start early when they are young.  This breed is very social and loves to be around their owners and other dog friends.  They are very active and athletic dogs.  If they don’t get enough exercise and attention, they can get into some mischief while their owners are away.  Weimaraner’s can live anywhere, but if you choose to get one & you don’t have a yard, make sure you take time to walk them and make daily visits to the dog park so they can exercise and put good use to all of that stored up energy.

Grooming:  Weimaraner’s have a short, flat coat, that sheds yearly.  It is recommended that you groom them in 4-8 week intervals. They need to have their ears cleaned and nails clipped. Weekly brushing is recommended also. Bathing can be done yearly and is only necessary when they are dirty.

Health:  While researching, I have found that Weimaraner’s have a few health issues.  Some may experience entropion, which is where their eyelids are inverted or folded inward.  This means the eyelashes scratch the eyeball and irritate it.  If this is not taken care of, the eye can have permanent damage.

A serious aliment among Weimaraner’s is tricuspid dysplasia.  This happens as the fetus is developing.  The right ventricle doesn’t form properly, causing the valve to not work as efficiently.  As a owner, you may not recognize the signs and symptoms.  Some dogs experience un-explained weight gain, their legs & tail feel cool to the touch, and some have a loss of energy.  Due to the lack of noticeable symptoms, the tricuspid dysplasia goes unnoticed until the dog experiences congestive heart failure. 

Exercise:  These dogs need more exercise than most breeds.  Some owners have reported that a two mile jog around the neighborhood might not be enough.  If you are considering this dog for a future pet, you may want to take some things into consideration.  As an owner, you need to make time to play and interact with your Weimaraner daily, and maybe ever more that twice a day.  Like a morning walk before you leave for work, and then another walk or jog when you return home in the evening.  If this isn’t enough exercise for them, an extra game of fetch might be needed.  These dogs require a lot of space to move around and stay mentally and physically engaged.  If not, they become bored and destructive.

Lifespan: 10-13 years

Trivia:  Due to the sleek silver and gray coat, the Weimaraner has been given the knick name “Gray Ghost”.

Sources:

http://www.animalplanet.com/tv-shows/dogs-101/videos/weimaraner/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weimaraner

https://www.espree.com/breedProfiler.asp?g=4&b=66

http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/weimaraner#grooming

http://www.akcchf.org/canine-health/your-dogs-health/disease-information/tricuspid-valve-dysplasia.html

http://www.iowaweimrescue.org/weimaraner-characteristics/

http://www.animalplanet.com/breed-selector/dog-breeds/sporting/weimaraner.html

http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/weimaranerphotos4.htm (picture credit)

Breed of the Month: Whippet

Description: The whippet is a medium sized dog whose coat comes in a wide variety of colors, such as black, white, cream, red, fawn, blue, brindle, and can be any combination of those colors. Their skull is long and lean. Whippets have a very dark colored nose, usually a dark variation of blue, brown, or black. They possess large, round, dark brown or black, eyes. The small ears are typically thrown back and folded along the long and muscular neck. The forelegs are straight, the hind legs are strong and powerful, and the tail is long and tapering.

History: The whippet was a culmination of breeds including –unsurprisingly– the greyhound, Italian greyhound, and a now extinct long-legged terrier. These dogs were bred in the late nineteenth century by the lower class in England and were used as a sight hound and for racing.

Size: Males: 19–22 inches at the withers, weighing 45–65 pounds. Females: 18–21 inches at the withers, weighing 25–45 pounds.

Temperament: The whippet is a very friendly family companion. While they are very energetic and require a daily run, they are content with being lazy and lounging around indoors. Since they were bred to be sight hounds, whippets have a strong prey drive and will chase and hunt down anything that runs and is smaller than the dog. Neighborhood cats beware. Since whippets have a very docile and friendly demeanor, they are naturally very good with kids, but they don’t like excessive roughhousing.

Grooming: Whippets require very little grooming and are an average shedder. Whippets are known to not have a “dog smell.” Typically, all the whippet needs for bathing is a wipe down with a moist cloth.

Health: The whippet is generally healthy and does not see many of the diseases seen in other breeds. For example, whippets are not known to experience hip dysplasia while ear, skin, and digestive issues are very rare in this breed. Some male whippets are known to have a higher frequency of cryptorchidism, defined by (either one of both) undescended testicles which can cause pain, reduce fertility, cause sterility, and increase the likelihood of testicular cancer.  The second leading cause of death among whippets are cardiac issues. The whippet has a slow beating heart which is prone to resting heart arrhythmia. Whippets are also prone to athletic hearth syndrome. Like all sighthounds, the whippet has an intolerance to barbiturate anaesthetics which is partly due to overall low body fat and the inability for their liver to metabolize the drugs.

Lifespan: 12-15 years.

Trivia: The whippet can run 200 yards in under 12 seconds. They can run around 36mph.